Memorable Monday #24

memorable-monday

Happy Monday! The purpose of memorable Monday is to showcase a book that you’ve read in the past and share how/why it has stuck with you.

This week I’m featuring:

Little Women
By: Louisa May Alcott
little-women

What made me think of this book for this week is the recent release of a modern retelling of this story. I’ve heard very different opinions about it from others. Some are excited for it, while others feel it’s best if left in it’s time. Personally I lean toward the latter, however it’s also probably because of how much I love history. Some stories just don’t feel the same in different times. Personally I like Little Women just the way it is in the book.

If you’ve read (or at least heard of) this story, what are your thoughts on the matter?

About the Book:

Generations of readers young and old, male and female, have fallen in love with the March sisters of Louisa May Alcott’s most popular and enduring novel, Little Women. Here are talented tomboy and author-to-be Jo, tragically frail Beth, beautiful Meg, and romantic, spoiled Amy, united in their devotion to each other and their struggles to survive in New England during the Civil War.

It is no secret that Alcott based Little Women on her own early life. While her father, the freethinking reformer and abolitionist Bronson Alcott, hobnobbed with such eminent male authors as Emerson, Thoreau, and Hawthorne, Louisa supported herself and her sisters with �woman’s work,” including sewing, doing laundry, and acting as a domestic servant. But she soon discovered she could make more money writing. Little Womenbrought her lasting fame and fortune, and far from being the �girl’s book” her publisher requested, it explores such timeless themes as love and death, war and peace, the conflict between personal ambition and family responsibilities, and the clash of cultures between Europe and America.

About the Author:Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania on November 29, 1832. She and her three sisters, Anna, Elizabeth and May were educated by their father, philosopher/ teacher, Bronson Alcott and raised on the practical Christianity of their mother, Abigail May.

Louisa spent her childhood in Boston and in Concord, Massachusetts, where her days were enlightened by visits to Ralph Waldo Emerson’s library, excursions into nature with Henry David Thoreau and theatricals in the barn at Hillside (now Hawthorne’s “Wayside”).

Like her character, Jo March in Little Women, young Louisa was a tomboy: “No boy could be my friend till I had beaten him in a race,” she claimed, ” and no girl if she refused to climb trees, leap fences….”

For Louisa, writing was an early passion. She had a rich imagination and often her stories became melodramas that she and her sisters would act out for friends. Louisa preferred to play the “lurid” parts in these plays, “the villains, ghosts, bandits, and disdainful queens.”

At age 15, troubled by the poverty that plagued her family, she vowed: “I will do something by and by. Don’t care what, teach, sew, act, write, anything to help the family; and I’ll be rich and famous and happy before I die, see if I won’t!”

Confronting a society that offered little opportunity to women seeking employment, Louisa determined “…I will make a battering-ram of my head and make my way through this rough and tumble world.” Whether as a teacher, seamstress, governess, or household servant, for many years Louisa did any work she could find.

Louisa’s career as an author began with poetry and short stories that appeared in popular magazines. In 1854, when she was 22, her first book Flower Fables was published. A milestone along her literary path was Hospital Sketches (1863) based on the letters she had written home from her post as a nurse in Washington, DC as a nurse during the Civil War.

When Louisa was 35 years old, her publisher Thomas Niles in Boston asked her to write “a book for girls.” Little Women was written at Orchard House from May to July 1868. The novel is based on Louisa and her sisters’ coming of age and is set in Civil War New England. Jo March was the first American juvenile heroine to act from her own individuality; a living, breathing person rather than the idealized stereotype then prevalent in children’s fiction.

In all, Louisa published over 30 books and collections of stories. She died on March 6, 1888, only two days after her father, and is buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord.

Now it’s your turn!

Share the name of a book you read in the past and why it was so memorable to you in the comments below!

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9 thoughts on “Memorable Monday #24

  1. I like the idea or remaking a classic in modern times. I think this is because I prefer contemporary stories to historical ones so I usually enjoy the modern versions.

    I hope you have a great week!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I love Little Women! I can’t even say how many times I have read it. I highly recommend a visit to Concord Massachusetts to visit Orchard House where the book was written.

    Liked by 1 person

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