First Line Friday #20

FLF

Happy Friday!

The book I’m featuring this week is:

Auschwitz Lullaby
By: Mario Escobar
auschwitz-lullaby

Amazon | Goodreads

“March 1956
Buenos aires,

I held my breath during the airplane’s steep ascent.”

I heard about this book a few months ago, so I’ve been anxiously waiting to get my hands on a copy. I’m so grateful I was finally able to score a copy through NetGalley and will be starting it shortly! I’ve already seen several rave reviews for this book from others who have been able to read it as well. Full warning, it’s apparently a book that will wreck you emotionally, but  it’s also one you won’t want to put down. The book goes on sale in just under a week, on August 7, 2018.

About the Book:
In 1943 Germany, Helene is just about to wake up her children to go to school when a group of policemen break into her house. The policemen want to haul away her gypsy husband and their five children. The police tell Helene that as a German she does not have to go with them, but she decides to share the fate of her family. After convincing her children that they are going off to a vacation place, so as to calm them, the entire family is deported to Auschwitz.

For being German, they are settled in the first barracks of the Gypsy Camp. The living conditions are extremely harsh, but at least she is with her five children. A few days after their arrival, Doctor Mengele comes to pay her a visit, having noticed on her entry card that she is a nurse. He proposes that she direct the camp’s nursery. The facilities would be set up in Barrack 29 and Barrack 31, one of which would be the nursery for newborn infants and the other for children over six years old.

Helene, with the help of two Polish Jewish prisoners and four gypsy mothers, organizes the buildings. Though Mengele provides them with swings, Disney movies, school supplies, and food, the people are living in crowded conditions under extreme conditions. And less than 400 yards away, two gas chambers are exterminating thousands of people daily.

For sixteen months, Helene lives with this reality, desperately trying to find a way to save her children. Auschwitz Lullaby is a story of perseverance, of hope, and of strength in one of the most horrific times in history.

About the Author:mario-escobar
Mario Escobar Golderos has a degree in History, with an advanced studies diploma in Modern History. He has written numerous books and articles about the Inquisition, the Protestant Reformation, and religious sects. He is the executive director of an NGO and directs the magazine Nueva historia para el debate, in addition to being a contributing columnist in various publications. Passionate about history and its mysteries, Escobar has delved into the depths of church history, the different sectarian groups that have struggled therein, and the discovery and colonization of the Americas. He specializes in the lives of unorthodox Spaniards and Americans.

Now it’s your turn!

Grab the book nearest to you and leave a comment with the first line. To see what First Lines others are sharing this week head over to Hoarding Books.

14 thoughts on “First Line Friday #20

  1. My first line is from Patriot Bride by Kimberley Woodhouse.

    Ten-year-old Faith Lytton placed her hands on her hips —like Mama did when she was exasperated— and looked at the sad little group of puny troops allotted to her.

    Like

  2. Happy Friday, Becca! 🙂

    My first line comes from The Trial by Robert Whitlow.

    PROLOGUE
    Truth will come to light; murder cannot be hid long.
    THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, ACT 2, SCENE 2

    Celeste Jamison tossed and turned but couldn’t sleep.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Happy Friday! My first line is from Love is Patient by Lila Diller:

    “I flipped through the pages of the bridal magazine yet again, from one dogeared page to the next, dreaming and desiring.”

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I’ve seen this one around and keep debating on whether or not to pick it up!

    I just started “Nice to Come Home To” by Liz Flaherty. The first line is: Why didn’t you ever come back here?

    Have a wonderful weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Happy Friday, Becca!

    I shared the first line of Veronica Roth’s Carve the Mark on my blog today. Here, though, I’ll share the book I’ve just started to read – A Touch of Gold by Annie Sullivan.

    “Once upon a time, a little girl helplessly watched as liquid gold spun a web across her tiny frame, racing to wrap her up in an icy cocoon.”

    I hope you enjoyed that. Happy weekend and happy reading! 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Happy Friday!😎

    My first line comes from a book I will be reading soon, Oh My Stars by Sally Kilpatrick.

    And it came to pass in those days, that a decree went out from my mother that I would be playing the Virgin Mary in the Dollar General drive-through Nativity whether I liked it or not.

    Haha! I love those first lines and can’t wait to read this book!

    Have a great weekend and happy reading!😊📚

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I’ve felt that way many times on ascent and landing, yet I keep entering airplanes. 🙂 On my blog this week I am featuring “Saving Truth” by Abdu Murray, Finding Meaning & Clarity in a Post-Truth World. Since I am still currently reading this book, I will share the first two lines from Chapter 4. “History’s most influential person expressly binds freedom to the limits of truth. “You will know the truth,” Jesus says, “and the truth will set you free.” (John 8:32)” May your weekend be a refreshing one for you.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. After reading your review of this book, I just can’t wait to read this book.
    Over on my blog, I’m showcasing the first line from Carolyn Miller’s new novel, Miss Serena’s Secret. It’s SO good. I’m almost finished with the book, so here I will share the first line of chapter 26.

    “I cannot help you.”

    A bit blunt and harsh! Lol.
    I hope you’re having an awesome weekend filled with great reading time. 😀❤📚

    Liked by 1 person

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